University of Illinois Extension
 

How High is Too High?

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The risk for heart disease is increased when there is too much cholesterol and/or triglycerides in your blood. However, the latest guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association, developed in conjunction with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute have recommended to not treat people to get to a certain blood level.1

However, your doctor may want to talk to you about medications to lower blood lipids if you fit in any of the following categories:

  • You have clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
  • You have LDL-cholesterol levels >190 mg/dL, such as those with familial hypercholesterolemia.
  • You have diabetes and are aged 40 to 75 years old with LDL-cholesterol levels between 70 and 189 mg/dL and without evidence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
  • You have no evidence of cardiovascular disease or diabetes but you have LDL-cholesterol levels between 70 and 189 mg/dL and a 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease>7.5%.

You can calculate your 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease by going to this site: http://cvdrisk.nhlbi.nih.gov/

1 Stone NJ, Robinson J, Lichtenstein AH, et al. 2013 ACC/AHA guideline on the treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk in adults: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association. J Am Coll Cardiol 2013. Article. Circulation 2013

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This document is a source of information only, and is not medical advice.