University of Illinois Extension

U of I Extension Gardening Web

Spring not only brings warmer temperatures, melting snow, flowers, and weeds but also questions from the home gardener, said Ron Wolford, University of Illinois Extension urban gardening educator based in Chicago.

“What is the best way to take care of those brown patches in my lawn? Should I cut back the foliage of my tulips right after they bloom? What kind of tree is best for my front yard? When should I plant broccoli transplants?” he said. “The answers to these and other questions can be found on U of I Extension’s Hort Corner website.”

Bulbs and More, Wolford noted, provides information on the basics of bulb care including what to do after the bulbs bloom. The web address is: www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/bulbs

“Watch Your Garden Grow is a comprehensive guide to growing, storing and preserving 34 common vegetables,” said Wolford. “Information provided for each vegetable includes recommended varieties, when to plant, spacing and depth, general care, how to harvest, common problems and solutions, preparing and serving, home preservation and recipes.”

The address for Watch Your Garden Grow is: www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/veggies

Thirty straightforward and informative fact sheets on lawn care are available at Lawn Talk. Information covered ranges from lawn grasses for northern Illinois to lawn repair and renovation to fertilizers to dealing with white grubs. The address is: www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/lawntalk

A novice gardener looking for the basics will want to visit A Taste of Gardening. It is located at: www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/tog

Help in selecting the perfect tree for your landscape can be found at Selecting a Tree for Your Home. The site sorts trees by size, exposure, tolerance and use. It includes a search function that allows users to select characteristics such as size and exposure that are specific to their yards. The address is: www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/treeselector

“Before you start your spring garden chores, it might be helpful to visit one of these web sites,” said Wolford. “A little research and preparation will make your early season gardening a pleasant experience.”