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University of Illinois

Holiday Home Safety: Candle Safety

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 28, 2012

Nothing is more alluring than the captivating warm glow and fragrant scent of burning candles. Decorating the home and holiday table with candles is traditional and still very chic. Scientists have been fascinated by the physics of burning candles for hundreds of years. Creating a beautiful and welcome holiday ambience in your home can be as simple as an evergreen foliage-and-candle arrangement on a table or fireplace mantle. But remember, a lighted candle it is an open flame.

According to the National Candle Association, accidental candle fires increase four-fold during the holiday season. Eighty-five percent of these fires could be prevented if consumers follow some simple rules. Do not spoil the tranquility with an accidental fire. The NCA urges all consumers to take special care with candles especially during the holidays.

Fact or Fiction: Placing candles in the refrigerator or freezer until they are very cold will make the candle burn slower or longer. Does this really work? According to the National Candle Association: Yes and No. While it is true that a cold candle will burn more slowly, it only takes a few minutes for the heat from the flame to warm the candle to room temperature. The extra burning time you may get is not much and probably not worth the effort or refrigerator space.

For more information on Candle Safety, visit the National Candle Association website athttp://www.candles.org/index.html.

University of Illinois Extension provides equal opportunities in programs and employment. If you need reasonable accommodation to participate in this program, please contact the Extension office at least two weeks prior to the event. University of Illinois Extension offers practical, research based programs that help people improve their lives and address critical community issues involving youth, families, economics, and natural resources.

Source: Drusilla Banks, Extension Educator, Nutrition and Wellness, dbanks@illinois.edu

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